BIll Hayes speaks to aspiring young golfers.

BIll Hayes speaks to aspiring young golfers.

For the youth of Winston-Salem, there are quite a few things that can be expected in the summer. Along with the high temperatures, no school and sunshine, another constant has been the annual Vic Johnson Junior Golf Clinic. This year, the clinic was held at the Reynolds Park Golf Course with regular participants from the Roscoe Anderson and Martin Luther King Recreation Centers.

AD Hayes (left), John Torian and his son, and Victor Johnson share a moment at the closing program.

AD Hayes (left), John Torian and his son, and Victor Johnson share a moment at the closing program.

In an effort to teach the game of golf to youth ages 8-15, who may not have had opportunities to learn the game, Johnson sponsors the clinic annually.  The clinic, which was held on Tuesdays and Thursdays,  served approximately 80 students from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at the Reynolds Park Golf Course.  The clinic started on June 12th and ended on July 5th. The highlight of the clinic was the closing program held on July 5th, when Winston-Salem State University Director of Athletics William “Bill” Hayes served as speaker.

Randolph Community College will soon offer a nursing degree through an agreement with Winston-Salem State University. Learn more here.

Stephen Joyner, Jr.

Stephen Joyner, Jr.

After two successful seasons as head women’s basketball coach at Winston-Salem State University, Stephen Joyner, Jr. is leaving the Rams program to join the coaching staff at Johnson C. Smith University. Learn more here.

Devin Davis (far right), a rising sophomore at Winston-Salem State University, was sworn in as a member of the Governor’s Crime Commission along with Kathy Dudley of the Division of Juvenile Justice and Senior Resident Superior Court Judge Douglas Sasser by Chief Justice Sarah Parker.

Devin Davis (far right), a rising sophomore at Winston-Salem State University, was sworn in as a member of the Governor’s Crime Commission along with Kathy Dudley of the Division of Juvenile Justice and Senior Resident Superior Court Judge Douglas Sasser by Chief Justice Sarah Parker.

Devin J. Davis, a rising sophomore at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU), has been appointed by Gov. Beverly Perdue to a three-year term on the Governor’s Crime Commission.

The Commission serves as the chief advisory body to the governor and the secretary of the Department of Public Safety on crime and justice issues.  Davis will serve on the Commission’s Juvenile Justice Committee along with judges, senior law enforcement officers, Secretary Al Delia from the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services and Dr. June Atkinson, State Superintendent of Public Schools.

“I have a strong desire to create the positive change I believe we need in the world today,” Davis said.  “I hope that by being a member of the Governor’s Crime Commission that I can bring a common man’s voice and a young man’s perspective to how we can reduce the juvenile crime rate.”

Since entering WSSU, Davis has been involved with the Student Government Association and served as a student representative on the Dining Hall Development and the Tuition and Fees Committees.  He is an active member of Black Men for Change on campus and has served as master of ceremonies for university events.  Davis serves as a social media specialist with WSSU’s Office of Marketing and Communications and also works as a sales lead with Foot Action, USA in Greensboro.

Davis is the son of Derrick and Keisha Davis of Reidsville and the grandson of the late Hertford County Commissioner DuPont Davis and Earline Davis of Ahoskie.  He is a 2011 graduate of Northeast Guilford High School where he was honored as a member of the school’s football team and is a member of the East White Oak Baptist Church in Greensboro.  Davis’ twin sister, Dasha, is also a student at WSSU.

H. Douglas Covinton

H. Douglas Covington

If you ever got to meet him or know him, you understood that he had a gentle way about him. H. Douglas Covington, former Chancellor at Winston-Salem State University, had a distinguished career in higher education, serving as chief administrative officer for several institutions across the country. He died Wednesday, June 27, at age 77. Learn more about him here.

What fans see are cars flying around the track at high speeds. But, there is a lot more to motor sport racing than driving a fast car. This summer youth found out what it’s all about. Learn more here.

For more than a century and a half, land-grant colleges and universities have been part of the backbone of the United States economy. These institutions have produced thousands of teachers, doctors, research scientists, farmers, economists, journalists, lawyers, and philosophers, and so much more. So what’s next?
See how Congress is discussing the Morrill Act here.

Mallory Green, a 2012 Mass Communications graduate, did everything she could to save money and keep her costs low. But, she, like thousands of other graduates across the country, is being hit with the double whammy of trying to find a job in a tough job market and trying to manage repaying her student loans. [...]

WSSU Mass Communications Students Spend Second Summer in the ieiMedia program in Italy

Four Winston-Salem State University students are among a total of 51 students from more than 10 universities around the world participating in the ieiMedia Multimedia program this summer at the University of Urbino, Italy.
This is the second year that students and Dr. Lona D. Cobb, a journalism professor in the Mass Communications Department have participated [...]

WSSU Program Helps Beginning Teachers Make the Transition

No matter how much classroom preparation a would-be teacher gets, nothing beats the actual experience of running a classroom as a beginning teacher. It’s a task that many new teachers sometimes find a daunting task as they transition from student to the teaching profession.
To help with that transition, Winston-Salem State University’s School of Education and [...]

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