Feb 212017
 

Faculty and students pose with the books just before they were shipped to Nigeria.

When she heard that an accidental fire had destroyed the library at her alma mater, the University of Jos in Nigeria, Dr. Alice Etim, associate professor of management information systems at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU), sprang into action to help.

Dr. Alice Etim

In November, Etim and Dr. James Etim, professor of education, teamed with colleagues and students from the WSSU Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP) to collect and ship books to the university.

More than 800 books were collected from the private libraries and collections of WSSU faculty members from all business disciplines. Faculty from computer science, education, law and statistics also donated.

Students from AITP, led by President Tyler Wilson, gathered, indexed and boxed the books.

On Feb. 7, with support from Dr. Notis Pagiavlas, senior associate dean of the College of Arts, Sciences, Business, and Education, 15 large boxes were shipped to Nigeria.

The fire, which was blamed on an electrical fault, led to the loss of more than half of the books and equipment at the library.

Dr. Alice Etim says the project serves as a reminder that WSSU’s motto, “Enter to Learn, Depart to Serve,” extends across the globe.

“There are urgent needs and opportunities to serve our less fortunate colleagues and partners as far as our hearts can reach,” she says.

Jan 112017
 
LaKeith Stevenson has partnered with Middle Fork Elementary School to provide our young men with role models for college readiness. He has adopted Middle Fork and has become a resource and support for the teachers and staff at Middle Fork Elementary. LaKeith departed Winston Salem State University to serve and he is doing this through his partnership at Middle Fork Elementary School.

LaKeith Stevenson has partnered with Middle Fork Elementary School to provide these young men with role models for college readiness. Stevenson adopted Middle Fork and has become a resource and support for the teachers and staff at the school. Stevenson departed Winston-Salem State University to serve and is doing that through his partnership at Middle Fork. “I started with this group in July 2016, after a meeting I had with the school’s Parent Involvement Coordinator,” said Stevenson about his volunteer efforts at Middle Fork. “I wanted to know what the school’s needs were and how I could help make a difference in the lives of the students, parents and the staff. That’s how a Male Mentoring programs got started which incorporates my non-profit organization ‘I Am A Bridge’.”

 

Dec 092016
 
Winston-Salem State University continues its push to support male youths in the public elementary schools in Winston-Salem. WSSU students in the EDU 2301: Advancing the Academic Success of Black Males class, who served as mentors to 4th and 5th grade boys at Ashley Elementary School, recently celebrated the end of the collaboration with a big closing celebration. The class made several trips to Ashley Elementary to spend time with the boys. The mentees and their families joined their mentors at the Reaves Center in Campus Hall for a closing celebration. There were smiles all around as mentors and mentees exchanged high fives. The mentees earned certificates and were to performances by the Red Sea of Sound and the Epiphany Modeling Troupe. Members of the Lady Rams Softball team led fun activities for the mentees during the celebration.

Winston-Salem State University continues its push to support male youths in the public elementary schools in Winston-Salem. WSSU students in the EDU 2301: Advancing the Academic Success of Black Males class, who served as mentors to 4th and 5th grade boys at Ashley Elementary School, recently celebrated the end of the collaboration with a big closing celebration. The class made several trips to Ashley Elementary to spend time with the boys. The mentees and their families joined their mentors at the Reaves Center in Campus Hall for a closing celebration. There were smiles all around as mentors and mentees exchanged high fives. The mentees earned certificates and were to performances by the Red Sea of Sound and the Epiphany Modeling Troupe. Members of the Lady Rams Softball team led fun activities for the mentees during the celebration.

 

Look I did it. I am a big deal. You can tell he is proud of his participation in the program.

Look, I did it! I am a big deal! You can tell he is proud of his participation in the program.

Nov 212016
 
WSSU Accounting and MIS students, faculty, and staff proudly display fruits of the can drive.

WSSU Accounting and MIS students, faculty, and staff proudly display fruits of the can drive.

Ah, ‘tis the season of giving, and students, faculty and staff from the department of Accounting and Management Information Systems (MIS) at Winston-Salem State University gave a lot, breaking their 2015 record by more than 1,200 cans of food.

The can food drive, supporting the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest North Carolina, produced 4,256 items, bringing the total weight of items collected since 2013 to 8,427 pounds. The drive was held Oct. 17-Nov. 3 and raised a total of 4,047 pounds of non-perishable food items to feed the needy in the community.

This fall’s campaign stands as the most successful effort in the four-year history of the drive. Faculty, staff and student organizations from Accounting and Management Information Systems (MIS) spearhead the project each year. The drive was the brainchild of Mary-Nina Ukariwo (2014), who served as president of Beta Alpha Psi (BAP), the accounting and finance honor society.

“Students learn to take responsibility for carrying a project to completion, and they develop problem solving and conflict resolution skills in the process. This was a success on a variety of levels,” said Dr. Sylvia Bembry, MIS Professor and BAP faculty advisor, on the benefit of the project.

”The greatest satisfaction comes from knowing that we as an organization made a significant contribution to the relief of hunger in Norwest North Carolina,” said Dr. Lynette Wood, chair of the Department of Accounting and MIS. “We also showed our students that giving is more powerful than getting. Real social justice is in making a personal effort to lift those around us and real business is about being a strong, uplifting citizen who empowers individuals and communities to be both contributors and consumers.”

Nov 142016
 
WSSU honors its veterans

Under a sunlit sky and gentle breeze, about 50 people took a moment out of their schedules to stop and pay tribute to those who have served and continue to serve America as service members in the United States military. Col. Valerie E. Holmes ’85, served as speaker for the Veterans Day Observance. Col. Holmes […]

Nov 012016
 
Dr. James Pope: A Professor on the Move

“The primary thing that motivates me is my extreme dislike of racism, colonialism and imperialism,” a reflective James (my father is known as Pope) shares. “There is a mantra that I was taught and live by: Your thoughts become words. Words become action. Actions become habits. Habits become character. Character becomes destiny.” James believes that […]

Sep 092016
 
Brandon Murphy: Making Noise in the Financial World

When Brandon Murphy ’10, arrived on Winston-Salem State University’s campus from Leland, N.C., in 2006 as a Chancellor’s Scholar, he knew that a career in finance was what he wanted to pursue. He threw everything he had into that pursuit. He majored in finance and was active in Honors Program activities and in the Office […]

Aug 262016
 
New Rams Learn What It Means to Serve Others

More than 900 freshmen in the Winston-Salem State University class of 2020 participated in 15 community service projects across the city of Winston-Salem August 19 to aid organizations serving thousands of needy people across the city. The community service projects activities were coordinated through Project GIVE (Getting Involved {through} Volunteer Experiences), the volunteer service program […]