May 122017
 

James Tate is recognized on stage during the Rams Choice Awards. 

Students have recognized James Tate, property security guard at the C.G. O’Kelly Library, for his work and dedication to the Winston-Salem State University and students.

Tate was surprised with the Ordinary Man Award during the Rams Choice Awards on April 19. The awards are through the WSSU Campus Activities Board. Read more in the O’Kelly Library Blog.

May 112017
 

A rendering shows the gazebo that will be added as part of WSSU’s $30,000 Retool Your School grant.

Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) has received a $30,000 campus beautification grant through Home Depot’s Retool Your School program.

The grant will support improvements to the historic lawn between Blair and Carolina halls.

WSSU qualified for the grant by receiving more than 100,000 online votes and social media posts  during a monthlong contest that closed on April 16. The initiative was led by WSSU’s Students Government Association.

The grant will pay for the materials to build a gazebo around the historic bell, which dates to 1900, as well as new park benches and landscape enhancements. According to the proposal, the improvements will create a new quiet space for students while honoring the university’s unique history. The gazebo will also help to protect the bell, which dates back to when WSSU was Slater Industrial and State Normal School.

In April, SGA launched a Zen Zone in the area  that will include hammocks. Students also will be able to check out, using their RAMCards, yoga mats and picnic blankets. This will create a green place where students can relax and “be free of cultural norms and judgement,” according to SGA President Mona Zahir.

WSSU was announced as a winner at a celebration at the Home Depot headquarters in Atlanta on Wednesday, May 10.

The proposal was developed by students from WSSU’s SGA in collaboration with WSSU’s Facilities Design and Construction. As part of the effort, which is being coordinated by WSSU’s Special Projects Unit, the bell will be restored with a weather-resistant coating.

The Home Depot Retool Your School Grant Program, established in 2010, encourages and recognizes innovative projects that contribute to the campuses of accredited Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Since the program’s inception, over $1.5 million in grant money has been awarded to our nation’s HBCUs to make sustainable improvements.

WSSU is the only North Carolina HBCU to win the grant this year.

A bold past. A brilliant future.

For 125 years, Winston-Salem State University has fostered the creative thinking, analytical problem-solving, and depth of character needed to transform the world. Rooted in liberal education, WSSU’s curriculum prepares students to be thought leaders who have the skills and knowledge needed to develop innovative solutions to complex problems. WSSU is a historically Black constituent institution of the University of North Carolina with a rich tradition of contributing to the social, cultural, intellectual, and economic growth of North Carolina, the region and beyond. Guided by the motto, “Enter to Learn. Depart to Serve,” WSSU develops leaders who advance social justice by serving the world with compassion and commitment. Join us in celebrating our 125th anniversary with events throughout 2017. Learn more at www.wssu.edu/125th.

May 112017
 

Edith Pungu (left) and Eomba F. Pungu (right) will earn their master’s degree in nursing from WSSU on May 19. Eomba Pungu’s daughter, Amnazo Muhirwa, is following in her mom and aunt’s footsteps.

Eomba F. and Edith Pungu are sisters by birth and also sisters in nursing.

The sisters, originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo, will cross the Winston-Salem State University commencement stage together for the second time in 10 years on Friday, May 19, earning their Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree.

“I’m so excited. I feel honored and privileged to once again walk to the podium with my lovely sister,” Edith Pungu says. “I could not have imagined being here without the love and support of my big sister. She has encouraged me when I felt defeated and helped me to persevere when the journey seemed unbearable.”

Eomba Pungu says: “My younger sister has been my cheerleader and backbone throughout this entire process.”

And the Ram connection continues with the next generation.

Eomba Pungu’s daughter, Amnazo Muhirwa, is also following in her mother and aunt’s footsteps. She earned her bachelor’s in nursing from WSSU, and also is enrolled in the MSN program . Next year, Muhirwa plans to take her degree one step further, pursuing her doctorate in nursing at Duke University through the Pathways to Ph.D. program, a partnership between WSSU’s School of Health Sciences and Duke University’s Division of Nursing.

The sisters, who both work as nurses in Charlotte, say they are excited about taking their career to another level, as family nurse practitioners (FNP).

“I can better serve my community with this degree,” Edith Pungu says. “In my eyes, the opportunities are endless. Nurse practitioners serve a unique role for the healthcare community, I am so grateful for the knowledge gained during my time at WSSU –  both for my BSN and now MSN-FNP. I cannot forget to express my gratitude to all the faculty and staff for all the knowledge, encouragement and time they have invested to make this accomplishment possible.”

Eomba Pungu plans to open a practice to serve low-income communities to increase access to care and provide health education.

“As an advanced family nurse practitioner, I am privileged to now serve on the frontline of healthcare,” she says. “There is a clear need in our community for an increase in healthcare access. I have witnessed the unavailability of adequate medical treatment in communities as well as preventable illnesses and disease prevail in lower socioeconomic groups.”

From Congo to WSSU

Eomba Pungu emigrated from the Democratic Republic of Congo, one of the poorest countries in Africa, in 1992. Her sister joined her three years later.

“Life was difficult for most families in Congo. To put bread on the table for kids was very stressful for most parents,” she says. “You might be surprised to hear this, there are no middle-class families, you are either very rich or very poor.”

Edith Pungu says she has dreamed of becoming a nurse since she was young.

“I recall seeing nuns back home helping people, and I would tell my parents, ‘When I grow up, I will be like them. I would like to work in a hospital and help the sick’,” Edith Pungu said. “I believe nursing runs in my family and truly is my passion.”

After two WSSU degrees Eomba Pungu says she may be ready to put away the textbooks.

“I have learned to never say never,” she says. “As of now I would like to take some time to relax and regroup. I do not know what the future holds in regards to returning to school, but WSSU will always be my school. I am a proud Ram.”

WSSU Commencement

WSSU will celebrate its 2016-17 graduates with events on May 18-19. More than 1,200 graduates have received their degrees during summer and fall 2016 and spring 2017.

  • Thursday, May 18: The School of Health Sciences will celebrate graduates at the Pinning and Awards Ceremony at 10 a.m. in the K.R. Williams Auditorium.
  • Friday, May 19: The 2017 Commencement Ceremony will begin at 9:45 a.m. at Bowman Gray Stadium (rain location Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum). For those who cannot attend, the ceremony will be live-streamed on WSSU’s website.

For more information on Commencement, please visit www.wssu.edu/commencement.

Apr 282017
 

Dr. Alice Etim

Two Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) faculty have been selected to work in Nigeria as part of a summer Carnegie Corporation fellowship.

Dr. Alice S. Etim, associate professor of management information systems, and Dr. James S. Etim, professor of education, will work with faculty at the University of Jos (UNIJOS) in Nigeria on course development and research as part of the fellowship.

The fellowship, through the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program, pairs African-born scholars who have been living and working in North America with their peers at universities in Africa. All visiting scholars’ expenses, including transportation, a daily stipend and the cost of obtaining visas and health insurance, are covered.

Dr. James S. Etim, who taught at UNIJOS from 1980-89, will be at UNIJOS from early May through early August working with Professor S. Gomwalk to redesign courses related to teacher education and English education, to work with doctoral students in English education, and undertake collaborative research with faculty and doctoral students in the Department of Arts Education.

“I really look forward to going back this summer to serve and make some impact,” he said. “The knowledge gained from this experience will also help me as I revise some of my courses to include internationalization and globalization, in line with WSSU ‘s new Strategic Goals. “

Dr. James Etim

Dr. Alice Etim will work on a project with UNIJOS Professor Tanko Ishaya that focuses on the development of courses in computer science, project management and health informatics. She will also engage in collaborative research with faculty and graduate students and lead workshops in the use of information and communication technology. Her fellowship is from mid-June through early August.

“It was an easy decision to accept the fellowship and spend the time at UNIJOS,” Dr. Alice Etim said. “As an alumna of UNIJOS, I really look forward to going back this summer to serve and make some impact.  I am very excited to spend the time to work with students and mentor particularly female students in computing.”

Both faculty said they hope the fellowship will lead to a long-term partnership between WSSU and UNIJOS on curriculum and programs.

Only 70 African Dispora scholars were chosen for the fellowships, which are funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and managed by the Institute of International Education (IIE).

A bold past. A brilliant future.

For 125 years, Winston-Salem State University has fostered the creative thinking, analytical problem-solving, and depth of character needed to transform the world. Rooted in liberal education, WSSU’s curriculum prepares students to be thought leaders who have the skills and knowledge needed to develop innovative solutions to complex problems. WSSU is a historically Black constituent institution of the University of North Carolina with a rich tradition of contributing to the social, cultural, intellectual, and economic growth of North Carolina, the region and beyond. Guided by the motto, “Enter to Learn. Depart to Serve,” WSSU develops leaders who advance social justice by serving the world with compassion and commitment. Join us in celebrating our 125th anniversary with events throughout 2017. Learn more at the 125th Anniversary website.

Apr 242017
 

Chancellor Robinson pins a new badge on Ulrick McDougald.

Winston-Salem State University Police and Public Safety celebrated the promotion of three officers at a ceremony on Monday, April 17.

Henry Gray has been promoted to captain, and Ulrick McDougald and Jermey Neal have been promoted to corporal. 

Family members, staff and administrators attended the ceremony.

More photos from the celebration are available on WSSU’s Flickr page.

Apr 232017
 
AT&T executives, WSSU faculty join forces to support student success

Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) faculty learned from AT&T executives how skills taught in the classroom help to prepare students to enter the workplace.  About 50 faculty and student leaders attended the first WSSU AT&T Academy on Thursday, April 13. The daylong event included breakout sessions where executives spoke about what they expect from new hires […]

Apr 222017
 
WSSU YAC celebrates ‘Forty Under 40’ inductees

The Winston-Salem State University Young Alumni Council celebrated young alumni and raised money for WSSU students at the Forty Under 40 Alumni Awards Gala on Saturday, April 8, at the Benton Convention Center.  The event recognized young alumni who “have gone above and beyond WSSU’s expectations to ‘Depart to Serve.’“ The honorees, graduates from 1999-10, […]

Apr 212017
 
WSSU, UNCSA seniors collaborate on Diggs Gallery exhibit

A unique exhibit is bringing graduating seniors from Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) and the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA) together, and exposing them to new areas of art. Pieces at the Diggs Gallery student exhibit, “Phantasmagoria: One World Between Our Worlds,” range from photography, paintings, sculpture and computer and graphic design […]

Apr 212017
 
Director named for CETL

Dr. Eli Collins-Brown has been named the director of the Center of Excellence for Teaching and Learning (CETL). Collins-Brown brings over 19 years of experience as an instructional developer, designer, technologist, and instructor. Most recently, she served in various roles at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, including the director of faculty development, faculty development fellow […]

Apr 212017
 
Minor League Baseball reaches out to WSSU students

Pat O’Conner, president of Minor League Baseball (MiLB), will be at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) on Thursday, April 20, to talk with students about careers and internships in professional sports.  The event, sponsored by WSSU’s Department of Health, Physical Education and Sports Studies, included a presentation from O’Conner and a question-and-answer session. “In order to […]